Learning How to Fish in New Zealand

I am often asked; “How hard is fly-fishing to learn?”  Trying to display empathy I typically explain; “It’s not that hard. Once you learn the basics, it just takes practice.”  I will also add: “It’s kind of like golf.  You’ll never master the sport, but you will learn more every time you are on the water.”  This explanation sounds pretty good, and holds fairly true to what I have seen in teaching beginners – but I haven’t truly experienced it myself until traveling to New Zealand.

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From Montana, New Zealand is on the opposite end of the world.  They enjoy summer during our winter, they drive on the left side of the road and Kiwis more often play on a Rugby paddock instead of a field or a diamond.  Despite these huge differences they still use a fly rod to catch Rainbow and Brown Trout. I was thinking: “No way it can be that different than fishing in Montana.” I quickly realized that was not the case.  Fly fishing in New Zealand requires a different approach and new skills. It’s completely different than fishing the blue ribbon streams of Montana.

“Bloody savage hook set, Mate!”

During the first week of the vacation we were fortunate to stay and fish with River Haven Lodge near Murchison on the South Island.  On the night we arrived we were greeted by the news that another guest had landed an 11 pound brown that day.  As we all toasted his trophy over glasses of champagne I started to have butterflies.  Even though double-digit browns are not the norm, I was still flooded with excitement to go chasing a big brown of my own the next day.  As much as I tried to manage my expectations I still had a hard time getting to sleep that night and sprung awake at the first sound of my alarm the next morning.

At breakfast that morning the owner of the lodge, Scott “the Trout” Murray, was on the phone touching base with other lodges in the area to see where guides had been fishing and what they planned for the day.  I appreciated this extra effort in communication that Murray spearheaded years ago in his region.  This quick phone call helps to protect the resource, prevents over-fishing of certain rivers, and overall, helps to create a better guest experience for everyone.  Scott enjoyed a good laugh when I told him about the typical day at the Lyon’s Bridge boat ramp on the Madison River where 30-40 boats are launching each morning.

As I was heading to the river with Doug Corbett, my guide for the day, we began to chat about gear and what our game plan was.  Through our conversation I was beginning to realize that this was going to be a new experience, and I began to share the feeling that a beginner must have when they first pick up a fly rod.  Doug recommended I used his rods, a 5WT and a 6WT, both already rigged for the day.  They were about the same as my rods until I began to look closer.  The fly line on both rods was hand-dyed to achieve a drab, trout-camo, effect.  Doug exclaimed that he has seen too many trout spooked by bright green floating fly lines.  Tied to the fly line he ran a 14-15′ delicately tapered leader and a single hand-tied fly rigged on the end.  I could appreciate Doug’s diligence in the set-up of his rods and in the organization of his fly boxes.  I could see how he had been educated by chasing picky New Zealand browns over the last 20 years.

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Doug leads the way on the Matakitaki

Sight fishing for big trout is why you go to New Zealand.  The ability to spot fish is a skill that can take a lifetime to develop and for guides like Scott and Doug – it is almost like a sixth sense.  The ideal conditions for spotting trout are clear blue skies, lots of sun, and little to no wind.  That day with Doug on the Matakitaki River we had partly cloudy skies and a building headwind as the day progressed.  Despite the conditions we still had opportunities to cast to a few big browns that morning.  The first fish that Doug spotted, I was not able to put eyes on because of the glare of the water.  I took his word for it and got into position as instructed.  As Doug coached me on distance and placement of the cast I was truly fishing blind, not seeing the targeted fish and having a hard time tracking my small indicator with the low light and glare.  I eventually got a drift through the desired location and Doug started yelling: “Go, go, go, set!”  I excitedly yanked the rod, vaguely imitating a hook set, and I felt nothing.  Doug hollered; “Bloody savage hook set, Mate!”

Just like that, I had missed the strike and the fish quickly spooked.

Before spotting the next fish, Doug had me take a few casts in a likely looking riffle, hoping we would fool a holding trout with our nymph.  I began working upstream with the “little brown nymph” hanging about 8 inches below my tiny yarn indicator.  Doug explained that Brown Trout will move up in the water column to feed and that the nymph ticking a rock could be enough to spook the fish.  He assured me that if the indicator went down it had to be a strike.  Sure enough, near the top of the run, the indicator dove underwater and I was hooked into a strong New Zealand brown.  After a quick battle, the “chunky monkey,” as Doug described it, was in the net.  It was a small fish by New Zealand standards, but my education was underway and the skunk was off.

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New Zealand “Chunky Monkey”

As we moved upstream we eventually found a couple of pools that held the browns I had been dreaming about. Unfortunately, each of the situations played out the same, with both of the 6-8 pound browns getting the best of us.  Even though I didn’t hook the fish it was amazing to watch them in their habitat and each situation provided huge learning experiences.  One of the first lessons was the importance of a drag free drift.  Both of these behemoth browns were sitting in spots with conflicting currents all around them.  Land the fly in the wrong spot and instantly my nymph was dragging across the current and looking un-natural to the fish.  When I would finally get the correct placement, and drift, the fish was more than likely wise to our presence.  I also learned the lesson of changing presentation by switching flies, changing size and adjusting depths.  We did not go more than two drifts without changing something in our rig.  I would get a good drift down the feeding lane, but no response from the fish.  Doug did not hesitate: “Change the fly.”  When targeting each of these browns we made about a dozen changes before either spooking the fish or deciding to move onto the next hole.  The excitement of getting the fish to look at the fly, or turn towards our bug, was more than enough to keep me engaged and determined.

Although I did not connect with either of these monsters I was able to walk away from the Matakitaki with a crash course education in hunting New Zealand Brown Trout.

“Stunner” of a Morning

Fast forward to one of my last days that I would be able to fish in New Zealand.  We were now near the bottom of the South Island staying with a friend in Te Anau on the edge of Fiordland National Park.  After leaving Murchison I endured a handful of frustrating fish-less days.  I was definitely putting in my time and practicing the skills I learned with Doug on the Matakitaki.  I had spooked more fish than I could count, did manage to trigger a few strikes but could not connect with the elusive NZ brown.

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Beautiful Day on the Waiau

On this “stunner” of a morning I was heading out with Mark Wallace from Fiordland Outdoors Company who specializes in Jet Boat Fishing Trips on the Waiau River.  Butterflies started to comeback as we got onto the water.  Mark was talking about the healthy fish population in the river and he explained; “It’s a great river for beginners.”  Fortunately it did not take long to loose the dark cloud that had been hovering over me on my last couple of days on the water.  In the first hole we stopped in, Mark spotted a chunky rainbow cruising around feeding just below the surface.  It only took a couple of drifts to fool this fish with our dry fly-dropper rig.  After getting on the board, Mark decided we would head to a spot that was known to hold Brown Trout feeding in the shallows.  We beached the boat at the bottom of a big run and started to stalk up the bank looking for fish.  As predicted, there were about a dozen browns holding near the bank feeding, spaced about 20 feet apart.  I quickly hooked the first one that we spotted.  Without hesitation this healthy fish was ripping line off the reel, heading towards the other side of the river, and before I knew it, my line went slack and the fish snapped off my fly.

Mark headed up stream and spotted a bigger brown but it wanted nothing to do with either of our rigs.  We both made a few good drifts and each presented a handful of different fly patterns to the fish.  Before giving up, I sorted through my flies and spotted a hand-tied Hare’s Ear that Doug had given me after our day in Murchison.  On the second drift my indicator dry fly disappeared and Mark hollered; “You got him!”  After a quick fight I had finally landed the New Zealand Brown Trout that I had been thinking about for months.

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5 1/4 Pound NZ Brown

Through this humbling experience in New Zealand I developed a new appreciation for some of the frustrations that all beginners go through.  With the help of River Haven Lodge and Fiordland Outdoors I return to Montana as a better angler.  To go back to the golf analogy, I now have a more refined chip shot and a few more clubs that I carry in my bag of tricks.

 

 

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Meaning of the Holidays

The Christmas tree has been cut down and decorated, stockings are hung with care and we have rung in the holidays with the annual Yule Night Celebration in downtown Philipsburg.thumb_24955544_10155940435895879_7948368567099956282_o_1024I must admit that the Holidays, and Christmas, have always been one of my favorite times of the year.  Just last weekend my wife compared my excitement levels to that of my 3 year old nephews, Gus and Odin.

IMG_0408This caused me to start thinking about why I love Christmas so much… Of course you have Christmas cookies and great food, you have quality time with family and friends, and not to mention, you can enjoy my all-time favorite Christmas song Run DMC- Christmas in Hollis.  Now I have discovered that adventure is the thing that ties together all these great holiday and Christmas memories.  Whether it was traveling to visit relatives, heading out to cut down Christmas trees and go sledding, spending my first Christmas away from home, or even some of the outings to Holiday company parties over the years; there is a sense of adventure in each of them.  So far this Holiday season has been no different.

In Montana the opening of Hunting Season is the unofficial start of the Holidays.  This year I spent most of the hunting season in Lima, MT while bartending at The Peat Saloon & Steakhouse.  Not only was I able to help a friend in need, but I was able to make extra money before winter sets in and it gave me the opportunity to explore an amazing area for hunting.  It was definitely an adventure to connect with the Lima locals and to get some experience in a fast-paced “beer bar” environment.  Although I did not get an elk, I was still able to bring home a Mule Deer for the freezer.

As Christmas and New Years approach, Gwyneth and I are looking past the Holidays and towards our departure for New Zealand in mid-January.  One of the downfalls of working in the service industry is that, in general, you have to work through a lot of the Holidays.  We are both in the same boat, working at The Ranch at Rock Creek for Christmas and New Years.  Fortunately, we have a five week vacation just around the corner.

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Photo courtesy of Maleleine Jayne

A trip to New Zealand is near the top of every anglers bucket list, and I cannot wait for our adventure!  I plan to fish around most of the South Island; focusing mainly on the west coast, the areas surrounding Te Anau and parts of the Southland region.  I hope to return with some great fish stories and a few pictures for proof, to do research for future hosted trips into the Southern Hemisphere, and most importantly, I cannot wait to leave the middle of winter in Montana and into a Summer Wonderland.

Cheers to many adventures through the Holidays!

Summer Highlights

 

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Labor Day is just around the corner and the “dog days” of summer are in the rear view.  Hard to believe that the season has gone by so quickly, but there is still plenty of great fishing ahead through September and October.  This summer has been filled with long beautiful days, great clients and some cooperative big fish.

June included big water and big browns on the prowl.  Most rivers were swollen with run-off from our above average snowpack, but Rock Creek and the Big Hole River still produced through the big water.  There was solid action dead drifting streamers and worms; plus some fish looking up for Salmon Flies and Golden Stones.

July brought dropping flows on our rivers and some epic days of dry fly fishing.  The Big Hole saw fish looking up for hatches of Green Drakes, Yellow Sallies and PMD’s.  The Yellowstone River finally dropped to fishable levels as terrestrials began to crawl around the banks.  Meanwhile, the Madison River produced some quality fish on nymph rigs.

Throughout August the skies have been filled with smoke from forest fires from around the state.  Despite the warm temperatures, and lack of rain, fishing has remained consistent.  Terrestrial fishing with Moths, Ants and hoppers and some thick Trico hatches have kept our trout interested.  With a few extra days off through the month I have had the chance to enjoy the Montana summer for myself.  I played a tourist by visiting Glacier and Yellowstone National Parks with with my wife and friends; and did some fishing on my own, hiking into the North Fork of the Blackfoot River with my dog Gabe.

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Fall fishing should be great as our water temperatures drop, nights get a little longer and the big trout begin to stock up on calories preparing for winter.  I still have some availability in October; check out this special offer to come chase some big fish this fall.

Exploring the Big Hole Valley

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This spring has been all about exploring. Discovering new stretches of river, new side channels, new honey holes, new dirt roads and hiking new trails.

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I have spent most of my free time in the Big Hole Valley.  Floating and exploring new sections of the river and discovering new areas in the Anaconda Pintler Wilderness area.    The Big Hole is a classic western river.  Flowing through a big scenic valley, fed by cold and clean snow melt, lots of bug life, full of beautiful wild trout and epic views.

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Scouting missions are always rewarding! Some days you figure out the super secret fly pattern, others you find the right line to navigate the rapids or other days you spend quality time with the dog.

Montana Stay-cation

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For a few months I have been day dreaming about a week long float on the Smith River this spring.  We successfully drew a permit for the float, my wife and I both got time off work and the I had planted the seed about the adventure with my best friends in Colorado months ago.  Everything was falling into place…

As our launch date approached the weather forecast turned south, friends had a change of plans and just like that my dreams of a week on the river crumbled.

Fortunately, I live in Montana and there is an abundance of vacation options just outside my backdoor.  To salvage our days off we took a “staycation” by spending a couple of days on Rock Creek about a half hour from our house.

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Rock Creek can sometimes be overlooked with all the other fishing and camping options around the state, but this recent trip reminded me of why I fell in love with this gem on my first trip to Montana years ago.  Rock Creek is a Blue Ribbon Trout Stream with a healthy population of willing Cutthroat, Rainbow and Brown Trout.  Being a small steam, it is only float and fishing option during the spring and early summer.  Float trips during this time of year can be unforgettable experience; great scenery, awesome fishing and all while having the river to yourself.

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Rock Creek is not only a great fishery, but it offers dozens of great camp sites and a handful of Forest Service Cabins available for rent.  On this springtime trip we chose to stay at one of our favorite cabins.  The four or five cabins along Rock Creek vary in size and accommodations and can be perfect for any getaway.  The Stony Creek Cabin has a convenient location, great outdoor fire pit and is the perfect size for us and our dog.

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Gabe knows a good Margarita when he sees one
As we were headed home we both remarked about how we both take the beauty of Rock Creek for granted since it is so close to Philipsburg.  Sometimes the best vacation is close to home.

Just Like Riding a Bike?

“It’s NOT just like riding a bike, John!”  My buddy Josh yelled from across the river as I lost another fish.  This type of banter is very common when on the water with good friends, but it also made me realize that practice is an important part of fly-fishing.

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Josh showing me how it is done

A brutally cold winter, working with a new puppy (not exactly a fishing dog yet) and my winter job forced me into a two month break from the river.  During the time away I was able to restock and organize my fly boxes, but my hook set was a little rusty.  Actually, everything felt a little clumsy; sloppy casts, poor line control, delayed reactions, etc.  In that first day back I hooked about 10 fish, but was only able to land two of them.  At the end of the day I realized that all the time spent on the river is valuable.  Each time out you are learning, improving and practicing.

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First float of 2017

Spring is the time to practice and start getting ready for the summer season.  Get your fishing gear out of the closet, or shed, and get organized.  Practice your cast in the back yard or the park.  Head to you local river or stream to knock off the rust.  Anytime spent practicing now pays off once you are in the midst of your favorite summer hatch.

Overnight & Multi-Day Packages for 2017

There is nothing better than waking up to the sounds of a flowing river, brewing fresh coffee next to a camp fire, planning out the float for the day and rigging up the flies to start the morning.  Hard to beat life on the river!

Since becoming an outfitter a few years ago I have had the goal of sharing this experience with my friends, and clients, by offering overnight trips on the river.  You can truly get on the “Montana pace” by immersing yourself in one of these adventures.  This summer I will be running two 4-day packages that will be unique Montana experiences.  Dry Flies & Camp Fires is scheduled for July 17-20 and the Fall Big Fish package will be offered from October 1-4, checkout all the details here.

The Dry Flies & Camp Fires package will include camping on the banks of Yellowstone River, fishing big dry flies, a visit to a local hot springs and much more.  The Fall Big Fish package can give you the chance at catching “the big one” and gives you the chance to explore the mighty Missouri River.

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Guides Day Off

“Make hay while the sun shines!”

This is the old saying for farmers, ranchers and fly-fishing guides around the west.  During primetime guide season days off are few and far between.  Near the end of August I ended up with few unexpected free days in a row.  Instead of using the days to refuel and relax on the couch; I decided to take the opportunity to explore the backcountry and Glacier National Park.

First, I made the expedition to a beautiful alpine lake in the Anaconda-Pintler Wilderness Area.

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After a long hike, approaching the base of Warren Peak, I found the lake with lots of big Cutthroat cruising, rising and searching for food.  I quickly got geared up and tied on a size 10, Olive Woolly Bugger.  On the first retrieve I watched a healthy 18 inch cutthroat follow my streamer all the way up to the bank.  With the crystal clear water, I watched the fish take my bugger about 2 feet away from my feet.

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After releasing that first fish I decided to tie on my favorite ant pattern to see if these beautiful cutties would eat a dry fly.  After landing a few more big fish the echo of my childish giggles rang throughout the basin.

Once I got back to the truck at the end of the day I was extremely exhausted.  Thankfully, I had my first trip to Glacier National Park upcoming the next day to keep me motivated.  Gwyneth and I had an amazing trip exploring Glacier, Polebridge and the surrounding areas.

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She is not only beautiful, but is a much better writer!  Checkout her full description of the journey:  One long drive for a bear claw.

Fish On!

I try not to go overboard with gratuitous grip n’ grin pictures, but I couldn’t help myself….

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Over the last couple of weeks fishing all around Montana has been excellent.  Being centrally based in Philipsburg, Montana I get the rare opportunity to explore & fish on a diverse selection of waters.  In the last month I have been lucky to guide on Rock Creek, Georgetown Lake, the Madison and Yellowstone Rivers.  Here are some of the highlights!

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Upper Madison Rainbow
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Big Browns Love Big Dry Flies
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Nothing Wrong with a Whitefish
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7 Year Old Fooling a Cuttie with a Dry Fly
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Brown Town on a Size #18 Dry Fly

Salmonfly Frenzy

Set, set!  There it is!  Fish on!  Bam!  Oh yeah!  Fish off!  Son of a #&*$@!

These are the echoes that fill the air through the canyons of Rock Creek as the annual emergence of the famous Salmonflies cause both trout and anglers alike to go into a frenzy.

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The trout have endured the long winter and the spring run-off, and they are now feeding on the buffet of stoneflies that have just started to hatch.  Just imagine someone tempting you with a t-bone steak or large pizza after you have gone hungry for weeks.  It is really hard for trout to resist the well placed dry fly during this hatch.

For anglers, this mythical hatch is really the first time all season when you can fish big dry flies.  We have survived months of watching the bobber, or twitching the streamer, and the thought of drifting a fluffy foam bug raises the blood pressure and the adrenaline gets pumping.

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This combination of ferocious takes and excited anglers can make for some of the most memorable and thrilling fishing of the summer.  You can have the opportunity to land dozens of fish, but in my experience, you typically miss more than you get to the net.  I have the bad habit of seeing the fish coming for the fly, getting anxious, setting the hook early, and pulling the fly out of their mouth before they eat.  Sometimes the fish aren’t really eating your bug.  Either they are slapping at it, rolling over it, or just trying to stun the bug as it floats by.  Other fish you set the hook and connect with, but because of the timing of the hook set, it comes un-buttoned.  Regardless of getting the fish to the net or not, it is hard to beat being able to see hungry Brown and Cutthroat Trout chasing down a big dry fly.

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Even though this hatch can be epic, you still need to be aware of some other factors that can effect your success in a stonefly hatch.

High Water

Receding river flows and water temperatures increasing trigger these big bugs into hatching.  The water levels may be dropping, but the flows are still very high and fast.  The high water makes wade fishing very difficult and non-advisable in some areas.  Fish are typically held really close to the banks hanging out under bushes and trees and these spots can sometimes be impossible to fish by foot.  Even if you are floating, you still need to be cautious of the swift flows and downed trees that have accumulated through the run-off.  Either way, being safe on the river is more important than catching fish.

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Crowds

Rumors of salmonflies travel very quickly.  Especially, in this day of social media the word of stoneflies crawling around can attract anglers from hundreds of miles away.  For some, this can detract from the serenity and peace of the outdoors, but there is plenty of river for everyone to enjoy.  We are all out there to have fun and it can be enjoyable as long as we are all courteous.  Share the river, share the road, and share the boat ramps.

Finally, the window for this hatch can be very limited.  Depending on the season, the salmonfly hatch can last anywhere from a couple of days up to a week or two.  This is when the phrase “should have been here yesterday,” can definitely ring true.

This is the time, get to the creek now before the salmonfly frenzy is over!

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